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ALCUDIA, HISTORY AND NATURE IN THE NORTH OF THE ISLAND OF MALLORCA
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#BALEARICISLANDS
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ALCUDIA, HISTORY AND NATURE IN THE NORTH OF THE ISLAND OF MALLORCA

Walking along the Alcudian city walls, one enters into the past of Mallorca, gaining an appreciation of how important this city was for the future of the island. In Roman times, when the consul Quintus Caecilius Metellus annexed it to the Roman Empire, the city known then as Pollentia became one of the main destinations in the Mediterranean and the true capital of the Balearic Islands.

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This charm is still evident today when visiting the remains of the Roman villa, located next to the entrance of Alcudia. Of particular note is a semicircular theater in a fairly good state of preservation, which was dug and carved into the rock, taking advantage of the natural slope of the land, with a capacity for 2,000 people, a figure that denotes the importance that this city acquired during the Roman Empire. It is the most important archaeological site of the Roman period in Mallorca.


From here, it is easy to imagine what the ancient Romans, and all those who visit the north of the island, fell in love with: the immensity of a bay punctuated by mountains full of pine trees and watchtowers, which sustains the strength of a turquoise blue sea with wetlands full of migratory birds.


This landscape can also be seen from the top of the old wall of Alcudia, looking down on the road to follow to enjoy one of the most beautiful corners of the island. If you visit Alcudia on a Tuesday or Sunday, take a walk through the lively market stands, where you can buy everything from typical gastronomic products of the island such as cheeses, sausages, pastries, oil or olives, to handicrafts and decorations, and colorful clothes, among many other items.


At the same time, Alcudia is also a modern municipality with a strong cultural scene. This is demonstrated by its Auditorium, which since its opening in 2000 has been the most contemporary emblem of the city. Its annual program includes everything from opera to circus and ballet performances, music festivals, and plays, among many other activities.


Leaving behind the cobbled streets of Alcudia, and the majesty of the Church of San Jaime, the road leads us to the port, an ideal place to enjoy long walks along the sea, a diverse gastronomic selection, and stores of all kinds.


In the port of Alcudia you will also find amusement and lively nightlife since it houses numerous bars and pubs, and some discos. Also, if you like sailing, you can embark from there on one of the maritime excursions that link the Port of Alcudia with other paradisiacal beaches such as Formentor, on whose route you may see a family of dolphins accompanying you during the crossing.


Alternatively, if you want to go a little further afield, visit the island of Menorca, which can be seen from Alcudia, and to which you can travel there and back in a single day thanks to the fast ferries that connect Mallorca and Menorca from Alcudia.


Leaving the Port of Alcudia, and continuing along the coast of the bay, the coastline dominates by immense white sandy beaches, interrupted by the tongues of the sea that join the coast with the interior of the Natural Park of S'Albufera, the most extensive and important wetland area of the entire Balearic archipelago.


It is an oasis that can be visited on foot or by bicycle, and during the hibernation season is home to up to 10,000 birds, including all kinds of ducks, herons, and large groups of starlings. Water is the basis of the biological richness of S'Albufera, and the one that allows the continuous growth of vegetation, forming a rich ecosystem that encourages biodiversity.


Visit it at sunset and let yourself be lulled by the croaking of frogs and the sea breeze, while looking through your binoculars for the chirping of swallows and the circling of cranes, which can be seen, from time to time, in its canals, making a brief stopover in their migrations.


For your convenience, the park has different itineraries, lasting between 1.5 and 3 hours, that will allow you to discover the most beautiful natural spots, interspersed with interesting towers and romantic bridges.


These are cultural and nature experiences that can be enjoyed for a long time to come. If you like sports, take advantage of the strong wind that often blows in this area, and practice kitesurfing on the beautiful beach of Son Serra de Marina; or escape to the end of the bay and discover the spectacular beauty of Betllem and its cove, which can be reached on foot by crossing a path that runs along some absolutely breathtaking cliffs. Once there, dive into its coves and enjoy the seabed of the area.


Here you will find a rugged landscape that has inspired artists from all over the world with its contrasts of white sand and majestic rocks; and calm turquoise blue waters, which at times are emboldened, turning the Mediterranean into a rough sea that proclaims its dominion.


When you return to your hotel, and if you are lucky enough to stay at Valentin Playa del Muro, you will appreciate the comfort of our facilities and the delicious cuisine, just what you need to recover from all your exertion. A glass of wine on the terrace of your bungalow will put the icing on the cake to a sublime experience in the north of the island of Mallorca. We look forward to seeing you!

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